Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

JH

Human-Robot Duets

AA
View Discussion
Simon Ingram's Digital Plastique exhibition as installed at Gow Langsford. Simon Ingram, Au court de tennis, 2017, oil on canvas, 1000 x 900 mm. Simon Ingram, Untitled (Wavepool), 2017, oil on linen, 1775 x 1600 mm Simon Ingram, Untitled (Firmament), 2017, oil on linen, 1775 x 1600 mm Simon Ingram, Untitled (Waterview skatepark), 2017, oil on linen, 1775 x 1600 mm Simon Ingram's Digital Plastique exhibition as installed at Gow Langsford. Simon Ingram, Rose et bleu, 2017, oil on canvas, 650 x 600 mm Simon Ingram, Untitled (Digital primitive), 2017, oil on canvas, 1000 x 900 mm Simon Ingram's Digital Plastique exhibition as installed at Gow Langsford. Simon Ingram, Composition jaune, 2017, oil on canvas, 100 x 900 mm Simon Ingram, Composition en gris, 2017, oil on canvas, 650 x 600 mm Simon Ingram's Digital Plastique exhibition as installed at Gow Langsford. Simon Ingram, Untitled, 2009, oil on canvas, 355 x 270 mm Simon Ingram, Peinture numero neuf, 2017, oil on canvas, 1000 x 900 mm Simon Ingram, Untitled, 2017, oil on canvas, 1000 x 900 mm Simon Ingram's Digital Plastique exhibition as installed at Gow Langsford.

There is also interest in inconsistency or saturation of colour, the way that in a stroke the hue becomes anaemic, losing over distance its chromatic power so that a continuous line becomes watery. Then there are the lines that result from wet strokes being applied on wet backgrounds; the supporting colour underneath creating a streaky marbling effect within the robot-drawn linear vector. These lines are normally more rigid and less frenetic than the wobblier hand-drawn flourishes.

Auckland

 

Simon Ingram
Digital Plastique

 

31 May-24 June 2017

The notion of partnership or team collaboration is the central concept in this show, a suite of nearly a dozen Simon Ingram paintings where human spontaneity is paired up with robotic preplanning (ie. programmed mark-making responses) - in order to bring interesting nuances to brusherly paint application and sticky, subtly agitated, grounds. Figuring out the chronological sequence of events is part of the viewer’s fun, deciding what has gone over, under, across or into the most salient image details; who (or what) made it, and which end of each painted stroke is the beginning.

When analysing the images one can consider which marks are (directly) human-made and quickly executed, and which are more slowly constructed by electronically programmed blocks of Lego holding brushes that daub and smear. Plus what has been obliterated - or made over-complicated - over time from the back-and-forth (robot-human) processes, or two robotic or human bursts in a row, so that traces of all that activity are now only partially seen.

There is also interest in inconsistency or saturation of colour, the way that in a stroke the hue becomes anaemic, losing over distance its chromatic power so that a continuous line becomes watery. Then there are the lines that result from wet strokes being applied on wet backgrounds; the supporting colour underneath creating a streaky marbling effect within the robot-drawn linear vector. These lines are normally more rigid and less frenetic than the wobblier hand-drawn flourishes.

Ingram initially composed these linear images on his Android phone (titled by where he was at the time), and blown up onto much larger canvases they become enigmatic diagrams with simple geometric shapes. Inside them are repeated patterns of short diagonal bars that hover in spread-out formation. Machine-drawn grids of lines are wrapped around bundles of squiggly hand-drawn marks, inserting freehand scribbles into diagonal patterns. We ask ourselves: are some of the short marks placed by the computer between the longer ones, or is it the other way round? Which set came first? Sometimes it is obvious; other times it isn’t. And after that ‘exchange’, then what?

Of course in the end, it is really Ingram A playing a tennis-like game with Ingram B, seeing the pre-planned robot doesn’t genuinely think in an off-the-cuff, impulsive or explorative sense. Still, we are forced to analyse mark quality: location, duration, tone, hue, background smudges and pigment consistency. Looking for processual clues. Enjoying Ingram‘s playful, mock-schizoid, cyber-expressionism, but about effect, not affect. Its construction via a conceptual elasticity of crisscrossing procedures.

John Hurrell

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

Recent Posts by John Hurrell

JH
Denise Batchelor, Tai Timu, 2020, HD video, colour, sound, 57 sec loop. Photo: Arekahānara

The Beauties of Jellyfish, Seaweed—and Art

MOKOPŌPAKI

Auckland

 

Maureen Lander and Denise Batchelor
Ebb

 

11 March - 25 April 2020
(*Dates announced before the Covid-19 lockdown)

JH
Carlos Cruz-Diez, Chromointerference, 2020, (install view) Aotea Centre Wrap, Aotea Square commissioned by Te Tuhi, Auckland, and Auckland Live presented in association with Auckland Arts Festival 2020 © Adagp, Paris 2020 photo by Sam Hartnett

Aotea Square Light Show

Aotea Square (Auckland Arts Festival)

Auckland

 

Carlos Cruz-Diez
Chromointerference

 

11 March - 29 March 2020 (sunset to 11 pm)

JH
Gretchen Albrecht, Torrent, 1988, gouache and collage on paper, 1520 x 2440 mm

Large Albrecht Collages

TWO ROOMS

Auckland

 

Gretchen Albrecht
Collages 1988-1989

 

6 March - 9 April 2020

JH
Ronnie van Hout, Ghosting, 2020,  painted MDF and pvc pipe, painted cast rigid urethane resin, expanded urethane foam, CNC expanded polystyrene, urethane spray, clothing, wigs, glass eyes,  3000 x 3000 x 3000 mm

Thoughtful van Hout

IVAN ANTHONY GALLERY

Auckland

 

Ronnie van Hout
Ghosting

 

4 March - 4 April 2020