Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

JH

O’Connor’s Choices

AA
View Discussion
Installation of HANDBUILT: made in clay, in Two Rooms Works by Denis O'Connor (2) and Peter Hawkesby (4) Works by Janet Beckhouse (Bats in the Belfry), Richard Stratton (Headpiece, Displaced Refugee) and Alex Pittendrigh (Emblem for a cartouche for the Column House at the garden of Le Desert. Works by Jake Walker (3), Peter Hawkesby and Graham Fletcher (2) Julia Morison (Headcase 27), Lauren Winstone (Pieces), Tanja Nola (Kilnbreaker, PRST), Graham Fletcher (Untitled (head 1)) Nichola Shanley (Mountain Overcoat); Alex Pittendrigh (Emblem for a cartouche for the Column House at the garden of Le Desert) Nichola Shanley (Mountain Overcoat); Alex Pittendrigh (Emblem for a cartouche for the Column House at the garden of Le Desert), Richard Stratton (Headpiece, Displaced Refugee) Julia Morison, Headcase 27 tanja Nola (Kilnbreaker, PRST), Graham Fletcher (Untitled (head1), Lauren Winstone (Pieces), Alex Pittendrigh (Corner piece for a Flaxman Room, Corner Piece for the Yellow Room at the Sir John Sloane House) Isobel Thom: Tea Set (2014); Tea Set (2014); Tea Set (2014) Virginia Leonard: Tippy Toes (2016); "Trust me", he said, "You'll get used to the look." (2016)

There is a lot to see here - it encourages intense lingering - and this is probably the best ceramics show you are likely to see in Auckland for a few years. It is not a sample of all that is around, for it tends to lean towards the organic, suggestive, mottled and earthy, studiously avoiding narrative and anything pure, cleanly delineated, industrial or Poppy. It has a focus.

Auckland

 

14 contemporary ceramicists
HANDBUILT: made in clay
Curated by Denis O ‘Connor


16 October - 26 November 2016

With this assortment of likeminded contemporary artists who explore the sculptural (and painterly) tactilities of ceramics, Denis O’Connor presents not only his and their work, but for plinths, an elegant installation of long-legged vitrines, a circular drop-leaf table and bulky rotund sculptures teetering on steel rods. Even before you start to think about clay (its weight and malleability), there is the Two Rooms space with its polished concrete floor. Rarely has this downstairs gallery looked so good.

Looking through the seven vitrines, only about ten of the twenty-nine exhibits are overtly functional, ranging from Peter Hawkesby’s bulbous earthenware teapots to Isobel Thom’s angular boxlike stoneware tea sets. Hawkesby has also made some glazed, hollow, log-like drinking containers for Vikings with unquenchable thirsts. Most of the show is ‘expressive’, for many of O’Connor’s choices are wildly inventive with the organic forms fully conversant with both exuberant and subtly restrained colour.

Much of this densely textured fired sculpture is formally quite exhilarating, such are the hard tactile qualities of say, Janet Beckhouse’s flaming fluid arabesques, Nichola Shanley’s sinewy and undulating jagged peaks, and Richard Stratton’s multi-facetted, planar towers. Some items, such as the hefty and dark contributions by Tanja Nola and Graham Fletcher, have a brooding, brittle yet lumbering, earthbound intensity, quite the opposite of the delicate and buoyant wall reliefs of Alex Pittendrigh, where pale bird and leaf-like forms seem about to float skywards.

Particularly astonishing are the two extremely fragile and fine stacked sculptures by Virginia Leonard - precariously teetering on stalks - that make you wonder how their transportation is at all possible - and what is stopping them from falling over. Like with most of the work here, your eye lingers on the bubbly modulated colour, needle-sharp stalactites, and richly worked surfaces that are amorphous when compared with the more geometric, formally structured and architectural constructions of Denis O’Connor himself - on the other side of the room.

There is a lot to see here - it encourages intense lingering - and this is probably the best ceramics show you are likely to see in Auckland for a few years. It is not a sample of all that is around, for it tends to lean towards the organic, suggestive, mottled and earthy, studiously avoiding narrative (surprising for O’Connor) and anything pure, cleanly delineated, industrial or Poppy. It has a focus.

John Hurrell 

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

Recent Posts by John Hurrell

JH
Installation of Jeena Shin's Movement Image Time exhibition at Two Rooms. Photo: Sam Hartnett

Shin Works on Canvas and Paper

TWO ROOMS

Auckland

 

Jeena Shin
Movement Image Time

 

27 October - 25 November

JH
John Stezaker, Marriage (Film Portrait Collage) CVI, 2013, collage, 30.3 x 23.3 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and The Approach, London.

Repulsively Enchanting Stezaker

CITY GALLERY WELLINGTON

Wellington

 

John Stezaker
Lost World

 

26 August -19 November 2017

JH
Tomislav Nikolic, How Long Must We Live Right Before We Don't Even Have To Try (Role Model), 2017: #1, mixed medai; #2, mixed media; #3, mixed media;

Tomislav Nikolic Paintings

FOX JENSEN MCCRORY

Auckland

 

Tomislav Nikolic

How long must we live right before we don’t even have to try

12 October - 11 November 2017

JH
Phil Dadson: Notation  Series #6 (961), painting; Tonethrone, instrument; HEADSUP@961: 23.8.16, projection

Dadson at Headlands

AUDIO FOUNDATION

Auckland

 

Phil Dadson
Shiver Me Timbres: Solos and Collaborations with a Multi-Voiced Instrument

 

5 October - 28 October 2017