Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

JH

The Friction of Wind and Road

AA
View Discussion
Phil Dadson, Aerial Farm, 2003, video still. Phil Dadson, Aerial Farm, 2003, video still. Phil Dadson, Aerial Farm, 2003, video still. Annie Bradley and James Dawe, grind every particle, frottage, 2013. Photo: Matt Henry Annie Bradley and James Dawe, grind every particle, frottage, 2013. Photo: Matt Henry Annie Bradley and James Dawe, grind every particle, frottage, 2013. Photo: Matt Henry Annie Bradley and James Dawe, grind every particle, 2013, installation at Audio Foundation. Photo: Matt Henry

An unrelenting Antarctic wind rushes across the guy wires which hold up a thin pylonlike pole and its tautly held hoop. This creates a range of high and low frequencies, rising as the velocity increases. Accompanying the subtly complex whistling sound are the spasmodic clicks of ice and snow particles hitting the glass of the lens.

Auckland

 

Phil Dadson /Annie Bradley and James Dawe
Aerial Farm / grind every particle

 

4 April - 4 May 2013

Two separate shows, but with overlapping themes, utilise two adjacent spaces at Auckland’s Audio Foundation. Phil Dadson shows Aerial Farm, a video that is one of his Polar Projects from 2003, projected onto a large wall. Nearby Annie Bradley and James Dawe display their frottages, twenty-seven textured rubbings made from road surfaces in the vicinity of Myers Park and St. Kevin’s Arcade. Both exhibitions have salient aural components.

Dadson’s video was one of seven he presented in his submission as finalist for the 2006 Walters Prize. It’s not on a monitor this time, but a wall instead. Subsequently greatly enlarged, but losing a little intensity, it becomes like a very big drawing, spreading out a web of delicate diagonal lines - a tracery of wires to catch incoming radio transmissions. The enclosed angular shapes are like aerially viewed paddocks on a farm or (looking up) the circular reinforcing structure of a tent; it’s a spatially complicated alignment of receding lines with a peculiarly inverted vanishing point.

An unrelenting Antarctic wind rushes across the guy wires which hold up a thin pylonlike pole and its tautly held hoop. This creates a range of high and low frequencies, rising as the velocity increases. Accompanying the subtly complex whistling sound are the spasmodic clicks of ice and snow particles hitting the glass of the lens. Dadson’s camera frame slowly ascends and descends along the vertical vector of the central strut, with occasional flaring white-outs and zooms zeroing in on cable brackets fastened to hold it firm.

Dadson’s shrieking gale makes an excellent foil to the audio recording Annie Bradley has made of her Toyota wheels interacting with the cambered macadam of the road. This is mainly a low rumble accompanied by a rasping grinding as the tyres cross the median strip and rub bumpity bump along the warning line of projecting ‘cat’s eye’ road studs. Bradley’s Starlet becomes an instrument, enabling the making of recordings during her daily drives to and from work - particularly when crossing lanes - documentation that can later be manipulated and fused through editing.

Bradley’s pencil frottages, made with James Dawe, look at textures found on the road surface, especially where it is ‘a patchwork, bogged, filled, chipped and in a state of endless repair’. There is a surprising variety in the two and a half dozen rubbings. Oddly about a quarter have fascinating linear configurations that look more derived from cut-metal edges than from compacted, embedded tar. They look like conventional drawings with cohesive meandering lines that might be faint pictographs or doodles - not an examination of gritty surface - and so are strangely mysterious. You are prodded into speculating about what sort of tactility could correlate with such flowing marks, mentally pondering a series of pockmarked planes where a visual examination only (without fingertips) does not help.

John Hurrell

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

Recent Posts by John Hurrell

JH
Robyn Maree Pickens, 'Respect the Rāhui' as installed as Te Tuhi Billboards. Photo: Sam Hartnett

Building Time Capsules

Te Tuhi Billboards

Pakuranga

 

Robyn Maree Pickens
Respect the Rāhui

 

1 December 2018 - 10 March 2019

JH
Michael Shepherd's 'Suppose The Future Fails' as installed upstairs at Two Rooms. Photo: Sam Hartnett.

Apocalyptic Maelstrom

TWO ROOMS

Auckland

 

Michael Shepherd
Suppose the Future Fails

 

30 November - 22 December 2018

JH

Classically Composed Improv

Rattle Records

Auckland

 

Eve de Castro-Robinson, with various musicians

The Gristle of Knuckles 2018

JH
Sam Hartnett's Ex Libris as installed at Objectspace. Photo: Sam Hartnett.

Three Libraries Remembered

OBJECTSPACE

Auckland

 

Sam Hartnett
Ex Libris

 

24 November 2018 - 24 February 2019