Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

JH

Melville Show

AA
View Discussion
Andrew Blythe, Untitled, 2007, acrylic on paper, 1250 mm x 1540 mm Andrew Blythe, Untitled, 2010, acrylic on paper, 820 x 1040 mm Andrew Blythe, Untitled, 2010, acrylic on paper, 820 x 1040 mm Andrew Blythe, Untitled, 2007, India ink on paper, 595 mm x 750 mm David Cox, Sing Out Spring - Yiyili Country, 2008, natural ochre and pigments on canvas, 900 x 1200 mm Colour and line installation at Tim Melville's Wayne Youle, Don't Take This Shit Too Serious, 2008, fluid acrylic on linen, 910 x 610 mm On the left, Jonathan Jones,  untitled (salt) A, and untitled (salt) J, both 2010 and graphic on Arches paper and 1130 x 730 mm. on right Sally Gabori, My Country, 2008, polymer paint on linen, 1520 x 1010 mm Elliot Collins, St Ambrose, 2011, resin on bookcovers, 410 x 445 mm Elliot Collins, Saints, 2011, resin on book covers

There's quite a range there, swinging between the cerebral (Collins, Youle, Jones) and the emotional (Blythe, Cox, Vivieaere) although contemporary brain researchers like Antonio Damasio and Joseph LeDoux seem to be now linking feeling with our ability to analyse, repudiating any dualism in our physiological, neurological processes, and making such binary distinctions redundant.

Auckland

 

Gallery artists
Colour & Line

 

22 June - 23 July 2011

In this group show we have twenty-four works from eleven artists, a large proportion coming from Australia (David Cox, Colleen Carter, Jonathan Jones, Sally Gabori and May Moodoonuthi), the rest being Kiwis (Elliot Collins, Wayne Youle, Andrew Blythe, the late Jim Vivieaere, Cerisse Palalagi and Nicola Donald). Melville has a special interest in Aboriginal art and (like say Stuart Shepherd) self taught artists.

There’s quite a range there, swinging between the cerebral (Collins, Youle, Jones) and the emotional (Blythe, Cox, Vivieaere) although contemporary brain researchers like Antonio Damasio and Joseph LeDoux seem to be now linking feeling with our ability to analyse, repudiating any dualism in our physiological, neurological processes, and making such binary distinctions redundant.

The works that personally excite me in this show come from Blythe, Collins, Youle, Jones and Cox. Andrew Blythe’s drawings are reminiscent of the East German eighties superstar A.R Penck but much much smaller and with a pinch of Maddox chucked in. He has an appealing holistic graphic sensibility that is whimsical as well as intensely obsessive - especially when using language.

Elliot Collins’ polyurethane covered pairs of book covers make you speculate on his possible vandalism (in the name of ‘art’) and why (formal or authorial titling reasons?) he can chosen the sets. They prod the mind to ponder over varnished colour, beauty, proportion and shape - as well as word choices (artist’s and authors’) and literary history.

Wayne Youle’s image of a skull wearing comically circular specs with a big plastic nose is a throwaway gag that lingers. Is the artist mocking death or praising it as the equaliser? Is the skull smirking at vanity and the temporal nature of life’s seeking of pleasure, or is the image a serious condemnation of humour itself, admonishing flippancy?

Jonathan Jones’ drawings on paper of sections of van Doesburg-like tilted grids are elegant and minimal, and nicely unpredictably lopsided. Based on lines found in the facets of salt crystals made in India and connected in his mind with Ghandi’s 1930 Salt March and the salination of the Murray River agricultural region - Jone’s own ancestral Aboriginal country. They have an austere beauty that is uncompromisingly particular - not too complicated or too much and yet not short on tension.

David Cox’s contribution mixes earth in with paint pigment to allow the chance texture to be an expressive component and spiritual symbol encased within linear rows of dots that frame inside the edges. In New Zealand this sort of surface treatment is found in paintings by Rudolf Gopas and early Peter Robinson, the later like Cox, focussed on material substance as symbol.

This show is a bit rambly; it could have been better shaped with more focus - after all what art is not ‘Colour and Line’? It’s sort of sprawling. You dip into it and explore, delving (as I have) according to what catches your eye, and ignoring the rest.

John Hurrell

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

Recent Posts by John Hurrell

JH
Installation of Jeena Shin's Movement Image Time exhibition at Two Rooms. Photo: Sam Hartnett

Shin Works on Canvas and Paper

TWO ROOMS

Auckland

 

Jeena Shin
Movement Image Time

 

27 October - 25 November

JH
John Stezaker, Marriage (Film Portrait Collage) CVI, 2013, collage, 30.3 x 23.3 cm. Image courtesy of the artist and The Approach, London.

Repulsively Enchanting Stezaker

CITY GALLERY WELLINGTON

Wellington

 

John Stezaker
Lost World

 

26 August -19 November 2017

JH
Tomislav Nikolic, How Long Must We Live Right Before We Don't Even Have To Try (Role Model), 2017: #1, mixed medai; #2, mixed media; #3, mixed media;

Tomislav Nikolic Paintings

FOX JENSEN MCCRORY

Auckland

 

Tomislav Nikolic

How long must we live right before we don’t even have to try

12 October - 11 November 2017

JH
Phil Dadson: Notation  Series #6 (961), painting; Tonethrone, instrument; HEADSUP@961: 23.8.16, projection

Dadson at Headlands

AUDIO FOUNDATION

Auckland

 

Phil Dadson
Shiver Me Timbres: Solos and Collaborations with a Multi-Voiced Instrument

 

5 October - 28 October 2017