Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

JH

Harrison Woodcuts and Statues

AA
View Discussion
Sam Harrison at Jensen,  installation of Crawling Man Sam Harrison, Crawling Man, wax on plaster cast, 540 x 1600 x 500 mm Sam Harrison, Two Women, woodcut on fabriano, 1280 x 715 mm Sam Harrison, Chloe, wax on plaster cast, 290 x 1630 x 460 mm Sam Harrison, 19.26, woodcut on fabriano, 1430 x 830 mm Sam Harrison, Nellie, woodcut on fabriano, 1280 x 715 mm Sam Harrison, Vincent, wax on plaster cast, 2140 x 545 x 580 mm. Sam Harrison, Chloe (plaster cast) and Vincent (woodcut on fabriano) in installation at Jensen.

Harrison's horizontal hatching lines, drawn to articulate body shape and accentuate volume, disintegrate when mingled with the speckled properties of the grainy intaglio-applied ink. The lines of black Catherine Wheel-like flares, eclipsed knots-as-moons plummeting downwards in twos or threes, add real drama to these images.

Auckland

 

Sam Harrison
Sculpture/Paper

 

16 November - 18 December 2010

Sam Harrison - from Christchurch - has had his work presented before to Auckland audiences, particularly in Andrew Jensen’s Naked group exhibition, but this is his first solo show: three white plaster sculptures (not black as previously) and four woodcuts (three new).

With the Ron Mueck show attracting big crowds in The Garden City, it is interesting to see some more nude sculpture up here from Harrison. These works, unlike Mueck, are not remotely attempts at realism (you’d never mistake them for the real thing, despite their accuracy in form), more a celebration of sculpture’s history and traditional subject matter. They reference a wide spectrum of art history from Rodin to Kiki Smith.

Harrison is interesting in that he plays off contrasting surface qualities - almost like a formal abstractionist. Some parts of the plaster bodies are shiny smooth and waxed so they look wet, other parts are dry, lumpy and raw. They have a gritty, crumbly coarseness in texture, especially around the extremities such as toes or ruffled hair.

A small, peacefully serene, pregnant woman, lying flat on the oil stained floor, is amazing with her small delicate feet and polished distended belly, while the bony fellow crawling on his knees, bum in the air, seems to be not so much grovelling as pounding the ground with his clenched fist.

The woodcuts are particularly successful because their images are more than just about chiaroscuro and (mostly) female figures interacting with shadow and light. The knotty splintery patterns of the gouged plywood have swirling vortices that cause ink densities to overlap and interfere with the clarity of the unclothed bodies - and partially obliterate faces gazing directly at the viewer.

Harrison’s horizontal hatching lines, drawn to articulate body shape and accentuate volume, disintegrate when mingled with the speckled properties of the grainy intaglio-applied ink. The lines of black Catherine Wheel-like flares, eclipsed knots-as-moons plummeting downwards in twos or threes, add real drama to these images.

The subjects of Two Women and Nellie, look confidently at the artist with a sense of gracious humour but in 19.26, the knicker-clad model is facing away towards a corner, her splayed knees push her ankles under her backside revealing the dirty soles of her feet. It’s a disturbing image, hinting at desperation, perhaps madness.

Vincent, one of the male models Harrison uses, is exceptionally tall, close to seven feet in height, and in the statue based on him his knobbly sinewy form has an oddly projecting right-hand rib cage that seems the result of some awful accident. The long horizontal woodcut of him lying in profile on his back - based on life drawing as with the other models - is a reference to Tony Fomison’s famous painting quoting Hans Holbein’s The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb, a work that has also inspired a well known photograph by Paul Johns.

The white plaster sculptures from Harrison seem less compact than the earlier black ones, more linear without compression - the less nuggetty forms being easier to look at. However because of their haunting mystery, an enigmatic eroticism, the grainy woodcuts are the real stars of this show. They take your breath away through the relationship between coarse woody surface and contained inky image. They are amazing.

John Hurrell

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

Recent Posts by John Hurrell

JH
Us v Them: Tony de Lautour, installation view at Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū. Photo: John Collie

Tony de Lautour Survey

CHRISTCHURCH ART GALLERY TE PUNA O WAIWHETU

Christchurch

 

Tony de Lautour
Us v Them


4 May - 9 September 2018

JH
Installation of Susan Te Kahurangi King's Paperdwellers: Works from 1967-1980 at Artspace, Auckland. Photo: Sam Hartnett

Battered by Rag-Dolls and Exhibition Designers

ARTSPACE

Auckland

 

Susan Te Kahurangi King
Paperdwellers: Works 1967 - 1980


1 June - 14 July 2018

JH
Peter Stichbury's Altered States exhibition, as installed at Michael Lett.

Peter Stichbury’s ‘Outer Body’ Portraits

MICHAEL LETT

Auckland

 

Peter Stichbury
Altered States

 

30 May - 30 June 2018

JH
Ash Keating's Gravity System Response exhibition as installed at Fox Jensen McCory.

Ash Keating Paintings

FOX JENSEN MCCRORY

Auckland

 

Ash Keating
Gravity System Response

 

31 May - 17 July 2018